Pets and Animals 

5 Places to Take Unwanted Animals

Why you should do it.

Animals are voiceless living beings that require just as much care and affection as people. It is because of irresponsible and/or hateful individuals that some animals are mistreated, abandoned, tortured, or killed for the sake of convenience. In addition, not spaying or neutering some animals causes over-population and increases feral and dangerous strays in communities. Some people do not agree with spaying or neutering animals, but it is a personal decision you must decide on as a responsible member of society. As a result of over-population, unwanted animals are being cruelly treated by their owners.

I do not advocate “dumping” on a regular basis and you should find other means to rehome the animals in an effective and caring manner. Taking the unwanted animals to the places listed below should be a last resort when you cannot find a loving home for them first. In an effort to subsidize the cruelty and decrease an over-population of unwanted animals, here is a list of 5 places you can take them.

ASPCA (or local humane society)

ASPCA stands for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. It is an excellent organization that raises awareness about animal cruelty for all species and participates with local law enforcement officials to crack down on individuals participating in these heinous acts. The ASPCA also offers help with immunizations and other medical procedures, rehoming unwanted or abandoned animals, provides education on how to care for animals.

As part of their financial need to keep operations going, the ASPCA offers fundraising capabilities on all levels of interest. They can range from individual donations to corporate fairs to marathons. The ties they have to the community is strong and the help promote the positive benefits animals can provide to all ages of people.

To take unwanted animals to the ASPCA you can drop them off during hours of operation. They will not normally question you or report you. However, it is important, if you are willing, to provide them with as much information as possible about the animal before leaving. They will be able to make an accurate assessment of the animal’s health and proceed accordingly. Some locations may charge a fee, so please be prepared.

Why you should do it.

Animals are voiceless living beings that require just as much care and affection as people. It is because of irresponsible and/or hateful individuals that some animals are mistreated, abandoned, tortured, or killed for the sake of convenience. In addition, not spaying or neutering some animals causes over-population and increases feral and dangerous strays in communities. Some people do not agree with spaying or neutering animals, but it is a personal decision you must decide on as a responsible member of society. As a result of over-population, unwanted animals are being cruelly treated by their owners.

I do not advocate “dumping” on a regular basis and you should find other means to rehome the animals in an effective and caring manner. Taking the unwanted animals to the places listed below should be a last resort when you cannot find a loving home for them first. In an effort to subsidize the cruelty and decrease an over-population of unwanted animals, here is a list of 5 places you can take them.

Shelter

Shelters do their best to rehome and care for unwanted animals and many times they are over-populated. It is important to call these places ahead of time to see what room they may have or if they can refer you to another shelter in the area.

Although you do not want to force your unwanted animal onto an over-populated shelter, it is the next best thing than dumping them in the middle of nowhere. Please patient enough to find a shelter that can take the unwanted animal.

Veterinarian

Sometimes your local veterinarian can assist you in rehoming or taking your unwanted animal. It is essentially one of the best places to take them because their facilities are set up to take care of the needs of different animals, even for a short while.

The office staff may ask you questions about the animal as well so please be open to their inquiries. If you do not want to get any more involved, kindly let them know that you do not want to offer any more information and that you merely wanted to help.

Police Station or Firehouse

In some areas, local law enforcement agencies partner with human societies and shelters to train and rehome animals. Some animals are even trained to participate as part of emergency rescue teams. However, you may be asked to pay a fee or contact a shelter first before leaving these animals at these stations. Call ahead and get the low down on how to get in touch with the right animal advocates.

Local Farms

This truly is a last resort place to take an unwanted animal. I hate to include it in this list, but a local farm is better than, again, out in the middle of nowhere. Some farmers need another animal to help deter pest problems or round cattle and sheep. They often have the space available for animals to “roam” and can provide areas for them to sleep.

If you live in a rural area like I do, finding a local farm is not hard. Around here, we talk to people face to face and give them courtesy of asking before doing. I would STRONGLY recommend knocking on doors to see if a local farmer is willing to take on your unwanted animal to see if they are in need of one to help on the farm. You may get several “no’s” before you get to that “yes”, but it’s important to try.

Attention to Prevention

As I mentioned before, some people do not agree with spaying or neutering their animals. Some people view it as a barbaric practice and others see it as population control. I personally see it as a safety net. Did you know that some animals have personality issues when they become pregnant or have offspring? Did you know that they can even become dangerous, even though they did not exemplify any characteristics before? The need to protect one’s offspring is innate in most animals and can cause stress in the family unit if the mother is unwilling to be open to human contact. Additionally, spaying and neutering can prevent over-population in a community and can also deter the acts of cruelty against unwanted offspring.

Just because someone is good to their animal now does not mean they will be good to their offspring. It’s a touchy subject, but you can spay or neuter your animal for less than $50 in some places and under $100 in others. You just need to shop around, call local vets and shelters, and even pet stores can offer assistance if you feel overwhelmed.

In our community, mixed breed animals are more adoptable if they are spayed or neutered. Pure bred animals are more adoptable when they are not. So, depending on the animal you have and the financial capability you have will help your decision, but you must do so within a specified time frame. Some facilities do not allow spaying or neutering until after the animals is a year old and had immunizations. Make sure to do your due diligence and find out before you take them in for the procedure.

Give them to me!

If all else fails and you cannot find a way to “get rid” of your unwanted animals, then by all means, bring them to me. Leave them on my doorstep with a note explaining when the animal ate last and I’ll do the rest. Honestly, I currently have the ability to care for another animal or two and will do my best to rehome them with loving individuals. You can even do it in the middle of the night so no one will see your face or what manner of transportation you used. In the grand scheme of things I really don’t care who you are, but I implore you to NEVER make claim to another animal again. If you can’t or won’t take care of them, then you shouldn’t have them in the first place. Leave me a message below if you know someone who has unwanted animals and I will do my best to help.

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